Welcome & Introduction

Floodlight

First, think about the branches of the tree, these are the consequences of a big problem you have identified. Write three to four statements that answer the guiding questions.

Next detail the trunk of the tree by defining the main problem you are addressing. Write a one to two sentence statement that answers the guiding questions.

Finally, move to the roots of the tree, which are the root causes of the big problem? Write three to four statements that answer the guiding questions.

Here's a reminder of the first opportunity you identified in the previous topic:

Now indicate the potential volume of product that could be redistributed.

Here's a reminder of the second opportunity you identified in the previous topic:

Now indicate the potential volume of product that could be redistributed.

Here's a reminder of the third opportunity you identified in the previous topic:

Now indicate the potential volume of product that could be redistributed.

Here's a reminder of the first opportunity you have identified.

Now ask yourself why does it become surplus? In the box below, continue to interrogate each answer by asking 'Why?' until you reach the root cause.

Here's a reminder of the first opportunity you have identified.

Now ask yourself why does it become surplus? In the box below, continue to interrogate each answer by asking 'Why?' until you reach the root cause.

Here's a reminder of the first opportunity you have identified.

Now ask yourself why does it become surplus? In the box below, continue to interrogate each answer by asking 'Why?' until you reach the root cause.

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Kaleidoscope

Now flip your first problem statement into a positive propositional statement.

Now flip your first problem statement into a positive propositional statement.

Now flip your first problem statement into a positive propositional statement.

As a reminder this is how you arrived at your first POV statement:

Now, in the text box below, reframe your statement by asking 'how might we' and continue to ask yourself how might we?

As a reminder this is how you arrived at your second POV statement:

Now, in the text box below, reframe your statement by asking 'how might we' and continue to ask yourself how might we?

As a reminder this is how you arrived at your third POV statment:

Now, in the text box below, reframe your statement by asking 'how might we' and continue to ask yourself how might we?

As a reminder from How Might We, here's how you arrived at your first idea.

Now, on the model below, plot your first idea

As a reminder from How Might We, here's how you arrived at second first idea.

Now, on the model below, plot your second idea

As a reminder from How Might We, here's how you arrived at your third idea.

Now, on the model below, plot your third idea

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Switch

Here's a reminder of the interventions you identified at the end of the HOW.WOW.NOW.NO exercise:

consider the wider system or systems that need to change.

1. Determining whether or not the intended site(s) in which an innovation is to be implemented is ready is a first step in the scaling process. 2. Realistic timeframes are necessary to develop any new skills, knowledge, and partnerships required. 3. User-friendly innovations are more likely to scale-up successfully. This includes those entailing shorter assessment and implementation protocols and those requiring less time and effort increasing knowledge and skills.

1. Adoption of an innovation is more likely in settings where innovative strategies and practices were adopted in the past. Perceptions that an innovation is highly useful (relative advantage) and of low risk if adopted facilitate the scaling process. 2. Realistic assessments regarding new skills and responsibilities expected for scaling-up any innovation are needed.

1. A rigorous dissemination plan should be drawn up. 2. Knowledge exchange and sharing platforms facilitate the scaling process. Local implementation stories, successes, and guidance should be compiled into an accessible, central resource. 3. Clarity regarding benefits, operational attributes, and goals is critical.

1. Boundary-crossing for a wider, more comprehensive knowledge and experience base is integral to the scaling-up process. 2. Engaging social networks in the scaling process is a critical influencing factor for promoting an innovation and the decision to adopt or implement it. 3. Involving senior leaders in the role of an innovation can increase the power behind the scaling process.

1. Implementing skills and capacity audits of the organisation or setting can help determine the feasibility of scaling-up an innovation as well as which human resources are already present and which will need to be recruited. 2. Practices and concurrent documentation procedures can help. 3. Training should be well planned and resourced. Training should begin before implementation. 4. Technical assistance and intensive exchange between the innovation originator or pilot team and the new setting and team aids scaling-up.

1. Leadership and influence need to be multi-directional, not just top-down. 2. Bridging the gap between top-down and bottom-up - spread should be a primary goal for innovation leaders. 3. Distributed leadership ensures that champions and advocates are located at all levels within an innovation setting. 4. Participative leadership is effective, whereby key influencers are seen to be regularly engaging with the scaling process.

1. This refers to unresolved tensions around the larger or core elements of an innovation. A lack of agreement around either the rationale for adopting the innovation or the interpretation of the supporting evidence can be particularly difficult to overcome. 2. Inconsistent perceptions, such as differing ideas about the level of risk.

1. Resource difficulties – both financial and human – could derail or stall the scaling-up of an innovation. 2. Flagging momentum or support. Too much reliance on a small number of advocates or champions, or on one organisational partner, can lead to organisational fatigue.

1. Geographic or collaborative isolation can stall the scaling-up process. 2. Silo thinking and behaviour discourages cooperation.

1. Too simple or complex an innovation design for the setting.

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Shine

What did you unfreeze?

What did you move?

What did you refreeze?

As a reminder, in the previous topic you identified the following outputs.

Now in the following box, describe the necessary inputs to achieve those outputs.

What is the practical cost of these inputs?

In this section gather information about how your business measures positive social and environmental impact. For example you may use a proxy about CO2 emission reduction or water use reduction based on the volume by weight of products saved from landfill. This may be in the form of β€œfor ever Tonne of product saved we save X amount of CO2 emissions and Y amount of water.” You can also use the WRAP proxy of ever 420g of food redistributed represents one meal to someone in food insecurity. Therefore you can create a simple argument that you changed something that cost X and it delivered and social and environmental value of Y.

Ensure you describe the environmental, social, and economic impact.

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